72 Decoding the Date from the Long Denderah Zodiac

The Long Denderah zodiac was shown on Figures 2.8 and 3.4, but in this section we will need a more detailed picture of this zodiac, which will be used to identify all the important features discussed below. Such a picture is presented on Figure 7.11. On Figure 7.12 we present a color-annotated picture (see section 6.8) of the Long zodiac. Let us recall the color convention that we used to annotate the zodiacs:

• RED for the zodiacal constellations;

• YELLOW for planets in the main horoscope;

• LIGHT-BLUE for the partial horoscopes and solstice and equinox symbols;

• GREEN for supplementary figures and scenes.

In the case when at the preliminary stage (before the computations) several variants were considered, we use multiple colors.

We will conduct the dating of the Long Denderah zodiac following the steps described in section 6.7.

Step 1. (See subsection 6.7.1.) Decoding of the main horoscope on the Long zodiac and compiling the color annotated zodiac.

By using the comparative tables (see sections 5.1 and 5.4) of the Egyptian astronomical symbols, we found all the symbols of constellations and planets in the main horoscope on the Long zodiac. We indicated them on the color annotated zodiac (see Figure 7.12), to which (as well as Figure 7.11) we will refer implicitly throughout the remaining part of this section.

7.2.1 Constellations Figures on the Long Zodiac

The constellation symbols on Figure 7.12 are marked in red. All the constellations are standard and easy to identify. Our identification is the same as suggested by Egyptologists (see for example [10]), used by N.A. Morozov, and N.S. Kellin and D.V. Denisenko.

7.2.2 Planets in the Main Horoscope on the Long Zodiac

We marked in yellow all the planetary figures in the main horoscope, which consist of all figures equipped with the planetary walking sticks, except those situated on other symbols or simply with their walking sticks placed over other objects. We explained in Chapter 5 that such planetary symbols do not belong to the main horoscope (see section 5.6 for more information on the pull-out symbols). In fact, they either refer to a partial horoscope (colored in light-blue) or are parts of a supplementary scene (colored in green). Let us list all such figures on the Long zodiac.

(1) A girl with a planetary walking stick placed over the back of Capricorn.

(2) A man with a falcon head and holding a planetary walking stick, who is standing on a goose. This figure is located in front of Aquarius close to the edge of the zodiac.

(3) A man holding a planetary walking stick and placed on a boat. This figure is located close to Gemini.

(4) A couple of females standing on a boat, one of them with a planetary stick. This symbol is located behind Gemini close to the edge of the zodiac. Notice that this walking stick is slightly different from a typical planetary walking stick on the Long zodiac. Nevertheless, this symbol could be a planet from the main horoscope if it wasn't standing on a boat.

Notice two other female figures with objects resembling walking sticks in their hands. The first one is Virgo holding a spike, and another one is the figure inside the circle beside Libra, holding with both her hands a long stick. This is not a walking stick — a handle on its top is missing. Moreover, on the Long zodiac all the walking sticks are held in one hand. However, any circle could be a representation of the Sun or Moon in the main or a partial horoscope.

All the other figures with planetary walking sticks are marked in yellow to indicate that they are symbols of the main horoscope. These figures are:

Figure 7.11: Long Denderah Zodiac. (Drawing taken from the Napoleonic Album [2], A.Vol.IV, Pl.20.)
Figure 7.12: The color annotated Long Denderah Zodiac

(1) Saturn — a male figure with a planetary walking stick in front of Aquarius close to the edge of the zodiac. On his head there is a crescent or horns in a shape of a crescent. The explanation why this planetary figure represents Saturn was given in subsection 5.4.2. This figure was also recognized by Egyptologists1, as well as T.N. Fomenko2, to symbolize Saturn. N.A. Morozov identified Saturn differently, however, it was a mistake due to an erroneous picture of the Long zodiac he used (see more details in subsection 5.4.2).

Consequently, Saturn on the Long zodiac is shown either in Aquarius or in Capricorn, so only these locations of Saturn are admissible for an astronomical solution. In other words, the range of admissible positions of Saturn is Aquarius and Capricorn.

Saturn, which is located at the very end of this part of the zodiac, is separated from Aquarius by five other figures and it stands beside of a decan of Capricorn. In this way, we will choose the best point for Saturn to be the boundary between Aquarius and Capricorn. Let us recall that the best point is the location of the planet that seems to be indicated on the zodiac. We use the best points to establish the required order of planets and to compute the mean discrepancy, which is not an objective characteristic, but still helpful for approximate comparison of solutions. However, the mean discrepancy plays no role in the elimination process of astronomical solutions (see section 6.12).

(2) Jupiter — a male figure wearing a high crown with a planetary walking stick, which is located between Pisces and Aries. Besides of his head, there is a hieroglyphic inscription "Hor-Apis-Seta, which accordingly to H. Brugsch means "Planet Jupiter"3.

Our identification of Jupiter on the Long zodiac coincides with the identifications suggested by N.A. Morozov4, N.S. Kellin and D.V. Denisenko5, T.N. Fomenko6, and Egyptologists7. We refer to subsection 5.4.4 for more detailed discussion of this symbol.

Consequently, Jupiter on the Long zodiac is either in Pisces or in Aries, so the range of admissible positions of Jupiter is Pisces and Aries.

On the Long zodiac, Jupiter is separated from Pisces by the same number of figures as it is separated from Aries, so we choose as the best point for Jupiter the boundary between Pisces and Aries.

(3) Mars — a male figure with a falcon head and a planetary walking stick, which is located between Pisces and Aquarius. Beside his head, there is a hieroglyphic inscription "Hor-Tos, what H. Brugsch translated as "Red Planet", which is a common name of Mars8.

Our identification of Mars on the Long zodiac coincides with the identifications suggested by N.A. Morozov9, N.S. Kellin and D.V. Denisenko10, T.N. Fomenko11, and Egyptologists12. We refer to subsection 5.4.5 for more detailed discussion of this symbol.

Consequently, Mars on the Long zodiac is either in Pisces or in Aquarius, so the range of admissible positions of Mars is Pisces and Aquarius.

Since Mars is separated from Pisces by a decan figure (belonging to Pisces), but its position is immediately behind Aquarius, we choose its best point to be the middle of Aquarius.

(4) Venus — a pair of travelers with planetary walking sticks located in between Aries and Taurus. This symbol consists of a male figure with a lion head in front, followed by a female with a star

1 See

[lO]

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The Illustrated Key To The Tarot

The Illustrated Key To The Tarot

The pathology of the poet says that the undevout astronomer is mad the pathology of the very plain man says that the genius is mad and between these extremes, which stand for ten thousand analogous excesses, the sovereign reason takes the part of a moderator and does what it can. I do not think that there is a pathology of the occult dedications, but about their extravagances no one can question, and it is not less difficult than thankless to act as a moderator regarding them.

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